Self-assembling Polymers for Gene Delivery and Biomineralization

Date: Thursday, December 1, 2011

Time: 8:00 PM

Location: Cardinal Room, Memorial Union

Self-assembling Polymers for Gene Delivery and Biomineralization – Surya K. Mallapragada

Surya K. Mallapragada is chair of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Stanley Chair in Interdisciplinary Engineering. Her research focuses on the development of new polymeric materials for medical applications, including neural tissue engineering, controlled drug and gene delivery, and as templates for biomineralization. The work has implications from cancer therapy, to nerve regeneration, to single-dose vaccines. Mallapragada is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. She is the recipient of an NSF Early CAREER Award and was named one of the World’s Top 100 Young Innovators, 2002, by MIT’s Technology Review Magazine. She earned her PhD in chemical engineering from Purdue University.

Sigma Xi Lecture Series.

Energizing America: Facts for Addressing Energy Policy

Date: Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Time: 7:00 PM

Location: Sun Room, Memorial Union

Energizing America: Facts for Addressing Energy Policy – John Felmy

John Felmy is chief economist of the American Petroleum Institute, where he is responsible for economic, statistical and policy analysis. He has more than twenty-five years of experience in energy, economic and environmental analysis. He spent eleven years forecasting the oil and energy industry for DRI under McGraw-Hill and served as director at Princeton Energy Research before joining API. Felmy earned bachelors and master’s degrees in economics from Pennsylvania State University and a doctorate in economics from the University of Maryland. The American Petroleum Institute is the primary trade association for the oil and natural gas industry in the United States.

Virtual Reality Experience

Date: November 11, 2011 Time: 1 to 2 p.m. Location: Alliant Energy/Lee Liu Auditorium, Howe Hall The VRAC public tour offers participants a chance to learn about virtual reality (VR), the unique research facilities at Iowa State, how VRAC uses virtual reality as a research tool and a look at how computer graphics technology has…
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EcoMind: Changing the Way We Think, to Create the World We Want

Date: Thursday, November 3, 2011

Time: 8:00 PM

Location: Great Hall, Memorial Union

EcoMind: Changing the Way We Think, to Create the World We Want – Frances Moore Lappé

Frances Moore Lappé is the author of 17 books including the three million copy Diet for a Small Planet. Her forthcoming book, EcoMind argues that the way we look at today’s environmental challenges robs us of power and prevents us from positive action. From global hunger to the environmental crisis, we have the resources we need to make a difference, but what Frances calls our “thought traps” hold us back. She is the cofounder of three organizations, including Food First: The Institute for Food and Development Policy and, more recently, the Small Planet Institute, a collaborative network for research and popular education seeking to bring democracy to life. Frances and her daughter have also cofounded the Small Planet Fund, which channels resources to democratic social movements worldwide.

Astronaut Clay Anderson returns to campus

Dates: Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Saturday, November 5, 2011

NASA astronaut Clayton Anderson (MS ’83 aerospace engineering) will visit campus in early November for several major events. Anderson will present a public lecture at 5 p.m. in Lee Liu Auditorium, Howe Hall, on Nov. 3, followed by a reception in the Howe Hall Atrium. On Nov. 4, he will be hosted by the Department of Aerospace Engineering and later attend the ISU Alumni Association’s Cardinal & Gold Gala in Des Moines. On Saturday, Nov. 5, Anderson will sign autographs at Cyclone Central in the ISU Alumni Center, and during the football game he will present the ISU flag he flew in space in April 2010.

Symposium to honor R. Bruce Thompson

Date: Thursday, November 3, 2011

Time: 9 AM to 4 PM

Location: Alliant Energy Lee Liu Auditorium in Howe Hall

IPRT’s Center for Nondestructive Evaluation is remembering Dr. R. Bruce Thompson with a symposium. Thompson, who passed away March 7, 2011, was CNDE director, a Distinguished Professor of Engineering at Iowa State, and member of the National Academy of Engineering. “As we approach the one-year mark of learning of Bruce’s cancer, it is fitting that we remember the many contributions that he made to the science and practice of nondestructive evaluation and to Iowa State University,” says Lisa Brasche, CNDE associate director.

Engineers at the Rec

Come out and have a good time with other engineers in a pick-up game of basketball, ultimate, volleyball or soccer.  Grab a friend, or several, and come to the Lied Recreation Center on Tuesday, November 1st from 7-10pm where AIChE has reserved several courts and a part of the turf.  Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to meet and socialize with other engineers. 

Genetically Engineered Foods: The Naked Truth

Date: Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Time: 6:00 PM

Location: South Ballroom, Memorial Union

Genetically Engineered Foods: The Naked Truth – Gregory Jaffe

Gregory Jaffe is the Director of the Biotechnology Project at the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), an advocacy and educational organization that focuses on nutrition and health, food safety, and sound science. CSPI was instrumental in pushing through the federal law to set standards for nutrition and health claims on food labels and create the “Nutrition Facts” label. Jaffe joined CSPI in 2001 after working for several government agencies, including as a trial attorney for the Department of Justice’s Environmental and Natural Resources Division and then as senior counsel with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Enforcement Division.  He was recently reappointed to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture’s Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and21st Century Agriculture, on which he also served in 2003-08.

Part of the National Affairs Series.

Virtual Reality Application Center’s Haunted House

Join the Virtual Reality Application Center (VRAC) for an afternoon of the creepy and crawly. The frights will be real and virtual. Come see some of your favorite characters. VRAC halloween style.

Bring your family and friends!!!

Ages:  5 and up

Dates:  October 23, 29, and 30

Time:  1-4 p.m.

Place:  1117 Black Engineering, Iowa State University

Universal Design in Electronic Voting: One Machine, One Vote for Everyone

Date: Friday, October 28, 2011

Time: 1:00 pm

Location: Alliant Energy-Lee Liu Auditorium, Howe Hall

Dr. Juan E. Gilbert is an IDEaS Professor and Chair of the Human-Centered Computing Division in the School of Computing at Clemson University where he leads the Human-Centered Computing Lab. He is also a Professor in the Automotive Engineering Department at Clemson University. Dr. Gilbert is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement Science (AAAS), an ACM Distinguished Scientist, National Associate of the National Research Council of the National Academies, an ACM Distinguished Speaker and a Senior Member of the IEEE Computer Society. Dr. Gilbert was recently named one of the 50 most important African-Americans in Technology.

How Agricultural Economics Saved Futures Markets: An Untold Story of Leadership

Date: Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Time: 7:00 PM

Location: Sun Room, Memorial Union

How Agricultural Economics Saved Futures Markets: An Untold Story of Leadership – Scott Irwin

Iowa State alum Scott Irwin is recognized as a national and international leader in agricultural economics. In recent years, he has made important contributions to the ongoing international debate on the role of speculators in commodity futures markets and is often quoted as an authority on agricultural markets in the financial press. His research and extension programs include AgMAS, a nationally recognized project that evaluates agricultural market advisory services, and farmdoc, an award-winning extension program that provides comprehensive risk management information and analysis for farmers and agribusinesses. Irwin grew up on a family farm in west central Iowa and earned his B.S. in agricultural business at Iowa State. He earned both an M.S. and Ph.D. in agricultural economics at Purdue University and is currently the Laurence J. Norton Chair of Agricultural Marketing at the University of Illinois.

The William K. Deal Endowed Leadership Lecture.

Science, Technology and Jobs – A Town Hall Meeting with Newt Gingrich

Date: Friday, September 30, 2011

Time: 11:00 AM

Location: Campanile Room, Memorial Union

Science, Technology and Jobs – A Town Hall Meeting with Newt Gingrich

Newt Gingrich was elected to Congress in 1978 and served the Sixth District of Georgia for twenty years. He was the architect of the “Contract With America,” leading the Republican Party to victory in 1994 by capturing the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives for the first time in forty years. In 1995 he was elected Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and led the firstre-elected Republican majority since 1928. He left the House in 1999. As an author, Gingrich has published twenty four books, including eleven New York Times best-sellers. Gingrich received his bachelor’s degree from Emory University and a master’s and doctorate in Modern European History from Tulane University. 

Part of the Presidential Caucus Series, providing the university community with opportunities to question presidential candidates before theprecinct caucuses.

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Hoover Hall

Revolutionary changes in the practice of engineering demand a complete transformation in the way we educate engineers for the 21st century. The Engineering Teaching and Research Complex (ETRC) is central to Iowa State’s efforts to strengthen engineering education, research, and outreach.

Designed as a futuristic, two-building complex (Howe Hall and Hoover Hall), the ETRC will facilitate an engineering education focused on enhancing student learning through advanced visualization technology, practice-oriented experiences on industrially relevant research, and regular interaction with visiting engineers.

Location
The Engineering Teaching and Research Complex will dramatically change the west side of Iowa State’s campus. The site straddles Bissel Road, and is bounded by Marston Hall on the east, Black Engineering and Beyer Hall to the south, the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory and a large open lawn area to the north and Sheldon Avenue to the west.

Loyal ISU alums will be happy to learn that the Marston Water Tower will be preserved and a large open space surrounding it will be created to serve as a gathering space and visual counterpoint to the surrounding buildings.

Features
Providing 163,000 gross square feet (98,000 net), the university will gain as much square footage as Black Engineering, Town Engineering, and Coover Hall combined.

Highlights of the project include:

A 400-seat auditorium
A 300-seat auditorium
High-tech classrooms with multi-media and distance education capabilities
High-tech lecture halls with computer demonstration and network capabilities, videodata projection systems, and uplink/downlink capabilities.
Teaching labs for low- and high-speed aerodynamics
Specialized labs for mechanical vibrations, acoustics, and stress analysis.
Nondestructive evaluation labs.
Interdisciplinary design labs
Museum/technology transfer lounge

Howe Hall

Revolutionary changes in the practice of engineering demand a complete transformation in the way we educate engineers for the 21st century. The Engineering Teaching and Research Complex (ETRC) is central to Iowa State’s efforts to strengthen engineering education, research, and outreach.

Designed as a futuristic, two-building complex (Howe Hall and Hoover Hall), the ETRC will facilitate an engineering education focused on enhancing student learning through advanced visualization technology, practice-oriented experiences on industrially relevant research, and regular interaction with visiting engineers.

Location
The Engineering Teaching and Research Complex will dramatically change the west side of Iowa State’s campus. The site straddles Bissel Road, and is bounded by Marston Hall on the east, Black Engineering and Beyer Hall to the south, the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory and a large open lawn area to the north and Sheldon Avenue to the west.

Loyal ISU alums will be happy to learn that the Marston Water Tower will be preserved and a large open space surrounding it will be created to serve as a gathering space and visual counterpoint to the surrounding buildings.

Features
Providing 163,000 gross square feet (98,000 net), the university will gain as much square footage as Black Engineering, Town Engineering, and Coover Hall combined.

Highlights of the project include:

A 400-seat auditorium
A 300-seat auditorium
High-tech classrooms with multi-media and distance education capabilities
High-tech lecture halls with computer demonstration and network capabilities, videodata projection systems, and uplink/downlink capabilities.
Teaching labs for low- and high-speed aerodynamics
Specialized labs for mechanical vibrations, acoustics, and stress analysis.
Nondestructive evaluation labs.
Interdisciplinary design labs
Museum/technology transfer lounge